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Geology and ESG Research Analysis

 

           

 

Metals are part of our modern lives and we must think sustainability through a process: Extraction-Integration-Recycling.

Ytterbium

Name

Ytterbium

Symbol

Yb

Atomic number

70

Group

HREE

Subgroup

yttrium subgroup

Occurrence / Extraction

Present in monazite.

Extraction:  Ytterbium is obtained from its ores by reaction with lanthanum metal

Use


Ytterbium is applied to numerous fiber amplifier and fiber optic technologies and in various lasing applications. It has a single dominant absorption band at 985 in the infra-red making it useful in silicon photocells to directly convert radiant energy to electricity.

Ytterbium metal increases its electrical resistance when subjected to very high stresses. This property is used in stress gauges for monitoring ground deformations from earthquakes and nuclear explosions.

It is also used as in thermal barrier system bond coatings on nickel, iron and other transitional metal alloy substrates.
Some ytterbium alloys have been used in dentistry.

Properties


Ytterbium is a typical metal. It has a bright, shiny surface and is malleable and ductile. Ytterbium tends to be more reactive than other lanthanide elements. It is usually stored in sealed containers to keep it from reacting with oxygen in the air. It also reacts slowly with water and more rapidly with acids and liquid ammonia.


Atomic mass: 173.04  g.mol -1
Electronegativity according to Pauling:  1.1
Density:  6.97 g.cm-3 at 20°C
Melting point: 824 °C
Boiling point:  1193 °C
 
Named after Ytterby, a village in Sweden.
 

Relative abundance

Ytterbium is one of the more common lanthanides. It is thought to have an abundance of about 2.2 to 8 parts per million in the Earth's crust. That makes it somewhat more common than bromine, uranium, tin, and arsenic.

atomic mass (g.mol -1)

173.04

density (g/cm3)

6.97

Oxydation number

+2 +3

Melting point (°C)

824

Boiling point (°C)

1193

Magnetic moment

 

Abundance in the Earth's crust ( ppm)

2.2

discovery

Jean Charles Galinard de Marignac (CH) in 1878